Tuesday, 19 July 2016

Flowers & Stripping(DIY)


My flower arranging book that I brought earlier this year and blogged about here has been very handy over the past few weeks as the garden's flowers start to bloom. I don't know what's happened, as my past attempts at gardening haven't paid off as much as this year's early start has. Perhaps its the chicken manure that I generously scattered over the flower patch back in March, starting to do its thing!



I had a sudden burst of DIY activity last week and on a whim decided to strip the paint off our front room door. It took longer than I thought and more paint-stripper than I had budgeted for too!



I counted two coats of paint that I had previously painted, a dark cream colour and then drab shades. As the house hadn't been properly decorated for a least a few decades when we moved in 15 years ago, I reckon that these were layers from the 1950s if not earlier. The final layer was the original grained wood paint effect that was applied to the doors when the house was built. Our neighbour's house still has the original paint effect on their doors and it looks really old fashioned - in a nice way of course!



So after numerous litres of paint-stripper, zooming around with the hand-sander (I loved that part after the tedium of stripping) and wire wooling it all down to a baby-bottom softness, both sides were finally finished - after three days work.



So here they are in their unadorned glory, apart from a few layers of beeswax. We're going to replace the manky old hinges with new brass ones and the original rim lock and handle needs overhauling, but I'm really happy with how its turned out. Only one more door to go now...


17 comments :

  1. Impressive! I remember when we lived in an Edwardian house we gave up after the first and sent ours to be stripped and sandblasted.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks - we did consider getting it dipped but I've heard horror stories of people's doors coming back warped that I didn't want to risk it.

      Delete
  2. That's one gorgeous door! Go you with the power tools. Ours are kept under lock and key and away from me! xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You need to get hold of those keys from Jon, Vix ;-D xx

      Delete
  3. Nice work! That door looks fab

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kerry - my nails didn't look fab afterwards though!

      Delete
  4. Ah-hah! This explains why, when I did an images search for "vintage 1970s stripper" this morning (don't ask), pics from your blog came up! And pics of Vix as well, haha! Nice work on the door, makes me knackered just thinking about it...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol! At least I'm in good company with Vix!

      Delete
  5. I must say I was intrigued by your title, the stripping part of it, that is. You did well to persevere, as that door is looking fantastic. I'm loving your flower arrangement too. xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I though the 'stripper' bit might intrigue people! I was trying to channel a bit of Constance Spry in my flower arrangement! xx

      Delete
  6. Go you! God, I love a power tool. Lovely door looks fab as do your fleurs. I swear by chicken poo it does the business!
    xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm deffo buying more chicken poo for next year's borders after seeing this year's poop-power! xx

      Delete
  7. Wow, that's hard work in such hot weather. The door looks lovely, though - hard work paid off.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Mim. Luckily, I was well shaded when working on the door - don't think I could have managed it otherwise

      Delete
  8. Of course the reason the doors were painted in the first place is that they were made of low cost softwoods. Graining,the paintwork was to give the impression of better quality wood.

    Commercial dipping often bleaches the wood and causes shrinkage, opening up the joints. Your door looks to be in good condition and looks very fine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Stephen. I didn't want to go down the commercial dipping route as I've heard horror stories of doors coming back warped and didn't want to run the risk and have to buy a new/old door to replace it.

      Delete
  9. Fantastic goods from you, man. I’ve understand your stuff previous to and you are just extremely fantastic. I really like what you have acquired here, really like what you are stating and the way in which you say it. You make it entertaining and you still take care of to keep it sensible. I can’t wait to read far more from you. This is really a tremendous site.
    Regards
    Deep Web

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment on my blog; I do enjoy reading each one.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...