Monday, 9 November 2015

Label Lover


I haven't come across much 'under the radar' vintage clothing in charity shops over the past few months much to my disappointment. What I have found though, is lots of over-priced stuff similar to that Vix described in her recent post here. However, I did find this 1980s tuxedo-style jacket last week in one of my favourite out-of-the-way shops.



What surprised me was that it hadn't been worn and still had both the manufacturer's and retailer's labels attached. But check out the original price for the jacket: £72.35 *gasp* - reduced to £10 in their sale (closing down one I reckon if the rest of their stock was similarly priced) then sold to me for £4.95!

I've done a bit of research on the Bernshaw label (love the fabric label with its font) and the company is still in production. Back in the day though, it looks like they supplied glam dresses to a few celebs including the ladies from 'Dallas'...


Photo Source
On my recent travels I've found some other old delights like this Venetian glass necklace, which I reckon pre-dates WW2...



...they look like sweets!


Also two books by Odhams: "Practical Home Dressmaking Illustrated" and...



..."The Practical Home Handywoman".



Not only does the last book cover the usual things you'd expect from a book of the time such as cooking and handicrafts, but it also explain things such as the maintenance of domestic machinery like the vacuum cleaner and lawnmower, and basic carpentry skills to make 'simple furniture' and even a dog kennel. This had me thinking; as it was published during the late 1940s, I wonder whether the book's primary audience were those women widowed during the war and left having to bring up a family and look after the home single-handedly. Even so, it still makes for an interesting albeit rather dated read.




12 comments :

  1. That jacket is a great find, how amazing it has original labels too. Jackets and coats can be a great thing to pick up in charity shop as even if you pay a tenner for a nice wool coat, it's still so much cheaper than anything you'll find brand new

    ReplyDelete
  2. How do you tell if a necklace like that is pre-war? I've bought similar beads from bead shops so I know they still manufacture that style, so I'm curious if there's a way of spotting that they're older if you see them on necklaces etc...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hiya! Good question - so here goes...Firstly the style of the necklace caught my eye and made me think of Twenties/Thirties style necklaces; I've also seen the necklace's basic toggle clasp on pieces of a similar age. Looking at the beads themselves, they have that 'aged' feel if you know what I mean and also have quite a bit of surface scratching. The wear/patina not only on the beads, but the metal beads and string also indicates age. Finally, having a Dad who knows a thing or two about antique jewellery also helps!

      By the way,as the beads look quite basic when compared to Venetian glass beads that are entirely made out of millefiori glass, I reckon that my necklace was made for the mass tourist/export market.

      Hope the above helps and thanks for the question :-)

      Delete
    2. Yeah, that all makes sense :) Clasps are usually a giveway -- I actually mentioned the same thing when Curtise was asking for things to look out for...

      Delete
  3. Nice find! My charity shops have been pretty 'dry' of late too...

    ReplyDelete
  4. Your idea on the Home Handy Woman book being for widows seemed such a sad thought, but is probably true, they would never of had to rewire plugs or think about the guttering when their men were home. The bit about making a dog kennel made me laugh though, as I remember my man making one (no idea why) and the dog wouldn't go anywhere near it. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! I bet your man wasn't happy after the dog ignored all his hard work! :-D

      Delete
  5. I'd be loathe to cut the labels off that jacket, but yes that was some price for the 80's!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great find! I've got a couple of Bernshaw's dresses but I've never seen a jacket before, it's gorgeous and a bargain, too. Loving the Burton hanger! xxx

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lovely finds! Great to see what you have been buying:)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love the jacket and I do have a soft spot for a label with a funky font! Seventy odd quid was a fortune in the Eighties. My gran gave me very similar beads that used to belong to her mum so I think you're right there. I have the Practical Home Handywoman too- I picked it up years ago a t a jumble withstacks of Seventies self sufficency magazines. I still read them when I feel like living in the middle of nowhere!
    My KB photo book is here but I can't have it until Christmas! Whose stupid idea was it to say 'I'll have that for Christmas'?!xxx

    ReplyDelete
  9. That Bernshaw jacket is a great find. I think I gave Vix a 1970s Bernshaw maxi dress ages ago (it was far too tiny for me!) with cut outs at the sides, it was fab! Oh Dallas - that photos makes me want to watch it all again from the start...
    I'm sure you're right about the post-war publications for women who had to manage on their own. When my mum had my eldest sister in the mid-1950s, she not only knitted and sewed, but made her a wooden baby walker too, she's a practical sort of woman! Love that final illustration. xxx

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment on my blog; I do enjoy reading each one.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...